Government Accused Of ‘Assault’ On The Rights Of Women And Minorities

Protests outside the Home Office on the anniversary of the UK's new family migration policy, which prevents UK citizens and refugees earning less than £18,600 from bringing non-EU spouses to live in the UK. Photograph: Peter Marshall/Demotix/Corbis

Protests outside the Home Office on the anniversary of the UK’s new family migration policy, which prevents UK citizens and refugees earning less than £18,600 from bringing non-EU spouses to live in the UK. Photograph: Peter Marshall/Demotix/Corbis

theguardian:

Equality campaigners have accused the government of a systematic assault on measures designed to protect women and minorities, amid fears that a key requirement to end discrimination is to be scrapped.

In a report out this week, the Fawcett Society accuses the coalition government of “weakening the legal and institutional measures concerned with equality”.

The report is timed to coincide with the review of a central plank of equalities legislation – the public sector equality duty (PSED) – expected in the coming weeks.

Ceri Goddard, the society’s chief executive, said: “Over the past 40 years we have seen progress in equality laws, albeit quite slow. At the end of two years of this coalition government we have seen a reversal and dismantling of these laws.”

A recommendation to remove the equality duty would take the government’s attack to a whole new level, said Goddard. “[It] would be a systematic dismantling of the state’s role in tackling inequality.”

Read the whole story at theguardian

 

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