Congress Will Keep Senators’ Tax Reform Wishes Secret For 50 Years

Ranking member U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) questions current and former IRS employees while they testify before the Senate Finance Committee as committee Chairman Senator Max Baucus (D-MT) listens on May 21 in Washington | Photograph by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Ranking member U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) questions current and former IRS employees while they testify before the Senate Finance Committee as committee Chairman Senator Max Baucus (D-MT) listens on May 21 in Washington | Photograph by Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Hill:

The Senate’s top tax writers have promised their colleagues 50 years worth of secrecy in exchange for suggestions on what deductions and credits to preserve in tax reform.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-Mont.) and the panel’s top Republican, Sen. Orrin Hatch (Utah), assured lawmakers that any submission they receive will be kept under lock and key by the committee and the National Archives until the end of 2064.

Deeming the submissions confidential, the Senate’s top tax writers have said only certain staff members — 10 in all — will get direct access to a senator’s written suggestions. Each submission will also be given its own ID number and be kept on password-protected servers, with printed versions kept in locked safes.

The promise of confidentiality was revealed just two days before the deadline for senators to participate in the Finance Committee’s “blank slate” process, which puts the onus on lawmakers to argue for what credits and deductions should be kept in a streamlined tax code.

Read the whole story at The Hill

 

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