Study: Polluted Environments Affect Rich and Poor Alike

Toxins and chemicals don't necessarily accumulate more in lower income people, according to a study by British researchers.

Toxins and chemicals don’t necessarily accumulate more in lower income people, according to a study by British researchers.

U.S. News & World Report:

It’s a commonly held belief among some in the environmental community that poorer people are subjected to the most polluted and toxic environments. But a new study suggests all Americans, rich and poor, have their share of toxins; where they are on the income ladder simply determines which poisons are in their bodies.

Using data from the Centers for Disease Control, researchers from the U.K.’s University of Exeter studied the associations between U.S. adults’ incomes and levels of 179 toxins. The researchers found that, among 18 toxins that appeared to be associated with income, half were more likely to be present in richer Americans than those at the bottom of the socioeconomic spectrum. That outcome came as a surprise to the scientists who conducted the study.

Read the whole story at U.S. News & World Report

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