The Truly Ridiculous Reason The U.S. Has No Surgeon General

Doctor Vivek Murthy stands among other bystanders during the first day of legal arguments over the Affordable Care Act outside the Supreme Court in Washington March 26, 2012

File – Doctor Vivek Murthy stands among other bystanders during the first day of legal arguments over the Affordable Care Act outside the Supreme Court in Washington March 26, 2012. | Jason Reed/Reuters

There is no constitutional right to ignorance. When critics attack someone’s opinion, it is not a violation of free speech. It is information communicated in the marketplace of ideas—what the First Amendment was intended to protect by prohibiting only government interference with speech.

Which brings us to the most over-inflated, spread-so-far-to-fit-any-belief principle in the Constitution: the right to keep and bear arms. Consider first what the Second Amendment doesn’t say. There is no right to keep and bear any arms (one person insisted to me that he has a constitutional right to have an atomic bomb). There is no right to keep and bear arms accessories (high-capacity magazines and drums that can be used to shoot as many as 100 rounds are not protected by the Constitution). And there are many restrictions, based on societal interest, on who has this right to keep and bear arms (the mentally ill and convicted felons can be prohibited from having them).

And finally, there is no right to be stupid about guns.

Read the whole story at Newsweek

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