Obama’s Approval Rating Remains Unchanged This Year, So Why All The Press Coverage About “Sinking” Poll Numbers

20141031-TG30001031-TGThe news media reminders arrive almost daily now: President Obama’s approval rating is low and going lower. McClatchy Newspapers highlighted the “dropping approval ratings,” while the Washington Post declared “President Obama’s approval ratings have plunged to record lows.” The Christian Science Monitor noted the numbers have “plummeted.” The Washington Examiner stressed the president’s approvals were “sinking to historic lows,” while an Atlantic headlined announced, “”Obama’s Sinking Approval Could Drag Democrats Down With Him.”

The portrait being painted by an array of media artists is unmistakable: Obama’s approval ratings are not only weak but they’re going down, down, down.

But it’s not true.

The part about Obama’s “dropping” and “sinking” polling numbers simply isn’t accurate, not matter how many times it’s repeated inside the Beltway echo chamber.

Does the White House wish Obama’s job approval rating was higher? I’m sure his advisers do. Does polling indicate that Democrats face the possibility of deep losses next week in the midterm elections? Yes. Does that mean the press should just make up narratives about the president’s approval rating simply because it fits in, again, with anti-Obama spin that Republicans are pushing?

It does not.

According to the cumulative ratings posted daily at Real Clear Politics, which averages together an array of national polls to come up with Obama’s composite job approval rating, the president’s approval on January 1, 2014 stood at 42.6 percent. The president’s approval rating on October 30, was 42 percent. So over the course of ten months, and based on more than one hundred poll results in 2014, Obama’s approval rating declined less than one point.

One point.

I can safely say Obama is only president in U.S. history whose approval rating dropped a single digit over a ten-month stretch and it was described as having “plummeted.”

Read the whole story at Media Matters

Conversations