Iran

The historic deal between Iran and world powers reportedly reached on July 14 in Vienna has paved the way for international sanctions against Tehran to be lifted in exchange for limits on its nuclear activities. From left to right, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier, European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammon, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz pose for a group picture at the United Nations building in Vienna, Austria, Tuesday, July 14, 2015. | Carlos Barria / AP

America’s Role: U.S. Leadership Is Maintained With The Iran deal

U.S. adherence will strengthen the agreement immeasurably and help ensure that Iran respects its terms over the long haul.

Clockwise from top left, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., Chairman Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., Sen. James Risch, R-Idaho, Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., and Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speak together before Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, and Secretary of Treasury Jack Lew, arrive to testify at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Thursday, July 23, 2015, to review the Iran nuclear agreement. | AP/ Andrew Harnik

Why Republicans Reject the Iran Deal — and All Diplomacy

Conservative hostility to this agreement is nothing new. GOP hardliners denounced Nixon and Reagan’s diplomatic achievements too.